Annual Meeting – Open Invite

DARE-UK Annual Meeting Registration open – closing date 25th of July, 2022

This two day Annual Meeting (7th-8th September) at Imperial College London will bring together research activities from the first three years of the DARE-UK project, there will also be external speakers from government and the wider UK greenhouse gas community as well as a discussion session gathering ideas on the best route forward for emissions verification.

7th Sept. | 9am arrival | 10am start | 5:30 pm end
8th Sept. | 8:30am arrival | 9am start | 3:30pm end

Newsletter

Stay up to date with the latest DARE-UK publications in our July 2022 Newsletter – Refinement in Carbon Budget Estimation and using ethane to track methane

COP26 and DARE-UK

Many of us contributed to COP26, sharing our work in poster sessions, seminars and panel discussions as well as carrying out a Glasgow- focussed measurement campaign ahead of and during COP26 Glasgow, November 2021.

Below is a brief summary of our COP26 activities with links to talks and posters.

  • Matt Rigby presented a poster at the ‘Blue Zones’ Earth Information Day entitled ‘UK greenhouse gas emissions evaluated using atmospheric observations.

  • At the WMO session on IG3IS (Integrated Greenhouse Information System), Alistair Manning, lead on integration in DARE-UK, spoke on promoting the use of atmospheric observations to help quantify emissions from point sources on city, national and global scales. The series of talks and discussion was chaired by Oksana Tarasova (Lead of GAW, WMO) and also included talks by Phil DeCola, Riley Duren and Jocelyn Turnbull. Watch the recording of the session here. Alistair Manning’s talk appears at 1 hour 6 mins.                          

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • DARE-UK and NPL hosted a Seminar and Panel Discussion – ‘What role does measurement play in climate action?’ as part of the COP26 Innovation Showcase event: 

    Delegates joined the event from a wide range of sectors including policy, academia and industry. After introductions from Matt Rigby, who chaired the event, Tim Arnold gave the opening talk. Tim highlighted the importance of greenhouse gas (GHG) measurements in climate policy and the delay in climate action that would have occurred had those early measurements not been made.

    Live polling was used to inform the speakers and engage the audience
    Participants were asked what major activities contributes to GHG emissions in the UK

    Four PhD student talks followed, opening with Alice Drinkwater who shared research on global methane changes over time; underscoring the large global increase of methane in 2020. Eric Saboya presented methane measurements and simulations that indicated under-reported fossil gas leaks in central London (image below). Julianne Fernandez talked on how lots of small fossil gas leaks of methane were found using mobile measurements across London. Finally, Thomas Eldridge showed how early satellite measurements could be used to make climate models more precise.

    Eric Saboya described how methane isotopes can be used to identify its sources

    A live tour of the one of the DARE-UK measurement sites was then given by Chris Rennick who showed off instruments used for atmospheric measurements. Rebecca Fisher narrated a video of equipment used for mobile methane measurements and shared findings from campaigns in Glasgow and London.

    Attendees then had the opportunity to ask our experts in academia and industry questions on GHGs and climate change in a panel discussion chaired by Matt. Alistair Manning (Met Office), Anita Ganesan (University of Bristol), John Watterson (Ricardo), Julianne Fernandez (Royal Holloway), Maryam Pourshami (Airbus), and Tim Arnold (NPL/University of Edinburgh) pictured below, shared their experiences working with policy makers, forming industry and public sector partnerships. We learnt more about the different career paths taken by the panel members and heard lots about the promising future of GHG measurements.

    Panel Discussion chaired by Matt Rigby (University of Bristol) with Alistair Manning (Met Office), Anita Ganesan (University of Bristol), John Watterson (Ricardo), Julianne Fernandez (Royal Holloway), Maryam Pourshami (Airbus not pictured), and Tim Arnold (NPL/University of Edinburgh)

DARE-UK International Summer School – 2022

DARE-UK & CLASS International Summer School on Global Greenhouse Gases

10 – 16 July 2022 National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK

Applications Closed

This intensive 1-week course is aimed at PhD students and post-doctoral researchers in the natural sciences who want to develop a solid understanding of the role of key greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the Earth system and the processes that govern their dynamics in the atmosphere, ocean and biosphere.

A previous summer school water sampling aboard the Calista research vessel in the Solent.

The residential course for 25 participants will be based at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton and comprises a combination of lectures, practical exercise, seminars and field/lab work. Organised by international experts in oceanography, atmospheric science and terrestrial biogeochemistry, the course will provide:

  • theoretical background on the role of greenhouse gases in the Earth System
  • field excursions and practical demonstrations in how to measure and model fluxes
  • interaction with leading experts in the field
  • the opportunity to network with other early-career scientists with similar interests.

Topics will include:

  • Greenhouse gases in ocean, atmosphere and biosphere
  • Instrumentation for measuring greenhouse gases: theory and practice
  • Process modelling of greenhouse gas fluxes
  • Satellite observations of greenhouse gases
Computational methods in greenhouse gas modelling will be put into practice.

Staff will be drawn from various institutions, including researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Exeter, Leicester and others, and UK research centres including the National Oceanography Centre, National Physical Laboratory and others.

All participants will be expected to present a poster on their research during the summer school.

The course will run from Sunday, 10th July, to Saturday, 16th July 2022.

Cost

There is a course fee of £375, payable before the course.

This (heavily subsidised) course fee includes all accommodation, meals and field trips during the summer school. Accommodation is in single ensuite rooms.

How to apply

Applications now closed. Places are limited to 25; we will allocate places based on the information you provide in the application form. We will inform you in March 2022 whether you have been accepted.

The course is open to all PhD students and early career scientists, both from the UK and other countries.

Contact

If you have any questions about the summer school or the application process, please contact Stephan Matthiesen (info@stephan-matthiesen.de).

Acknowledgement

The Summer School is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council as part of the DARE-UK project, and CLASS (Climate-Linked Atlantic Sector Science) project. DARE-UK is a NERC highlight topic NE/S004211/1, CLASS is a NERC National Capability programme (https://projects.noc.ac.uk/class-project/, NE/R015953/1). Additional support is provided by the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton.

Full Seminar Series available to watch now

We are delighted to share that you can watch external and DARE-UK experts talk about their specialist areas from our Seminar series which took place over 2021:

Carbon Dioxide Inverse Modelling, Mark Lunt (U. Edin) & Ingrid Super (TNO)

Methane Isotopes, Emma Safi (NPL & U Edin) & Natasha Miles (Penn State Uni.)

Anthropogenic Fluxes and Inventories, Pete Levy (CEH) & Hugo Denier (TNO)

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Modeling, Luke Smallman (U of Edin.) & Silvia Caldararu (MPI Jena)

Radon measurements and modeling, Ute Karstens (Lund Uni.)

Nitrous Oxide from agriculture and the north Western European shelf, Tom Misslebrook (Rothamsted) and Yuri Artioli (Plymouth Marine Laboratory)

DARE UK YouTube Channel

Check out the new ‘DARE UK’ YouTube Channel. You’ll find:

DARE-UK International Summer School – July 2021

DARE-UK International Summer School on Global Greenhouse Gases

Summer School Postponed until July, 2022

The summer school will not be held this year due to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic. It is expected that the crisis will affect the UK, Europe and the World for at least several months with associated restrictions on events and travelling.

We are planning to run the school in 2021 around the same time of the year (mid-July) with a similar programme, so please check back in the following weeks and months for updates.

We apologise to everybody who was looking forward to this learning opportunity and hope you will be able to apply next year.

In the meantime, please follow current advice from the medical authorities and your own institution to keep yourself save and help other, more vulnerable people manage this crisis.

National Oceanography Center (NOC), Southampton, UK

This intensive 1-week course is aimed at PhD students and post-doctoral researchers in the natural sciences who want to develop a solid understanding of the role of key greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the Earth system and the processes that govern their dynamics in the atmosphere, ocean and biosphere.

A field trip to a forestry research site will form one of the practical days in the week long summer school.

The residential course for 20-25 participants will be based at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) in Southampton and comprises a combination of lectures, practical exercise, seminars and field/lab work. Organised by international experts in oceanography, atmospheric science and terrestrial biogeochemistry, the course will provide:

  • theoretical background on the role of greenhouse gases in the Earth System
  • field excursions and practical demonstrations in how to measure and model fluxes
  • interaction with leading experts in the field
  • the opportunity to network with other early-career scientists with similar interests.
A previous summer school water sampling aboard the Calista research vessel in the Solent. This will form another of the field trips during the week.

Topics will include:

  • Greenhouse gases in ocean, atmosphere and biosphere, with a focus on carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O)
  • Instrumentation for measuring GHGs: theory and practice
  • Process modelling of GHG fluxes
  • Satellite observations of GHGs
  • Measuring and up-scaling fluxes in the terrestrial biosphere

Staff will be drawn from various institutions, including researchers from the Universities of Bristol, University of Exeter and others, and UK research centres including National Oceanography Centre (NOC), Forestry Research (FR), National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and others.

All participants will be expected to present a poster on their research during the summer school.

The course will start after lunch time on Sunday, 12th July, and finish at noon on Saturday, 18th July; students can travel on those days.

Computational methods in greenhouse gas modelling will be put into practice.

Cost and funding

There is a course fee of £870, payable before the course.

This includes all accommodation, meals and field trips during the summer school. Accommodation is in single standard (non-ensuite) rooms in a student residence.

How to apply – deadline 15 April 2020

The summer school has been postponed until 2021, so registration is not currently possible. Please check back later for updates on the arrangements for 2021.

The course is open to all PhD students and early career scientists, both from the UK and other countries.

Hands on experience with field instrumentation on a previous forest field trip.

Contact

If you have any questions about the summer school or if the application form does not work for you, please contact Stephan Matthiesen (info@stephan-matthiesen.de).

Acknowledgement

The Summer School is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council as part of the DARE-UK project. DARE-UK is a NERC highlight topic NE/S004211/1.

National greenhouse gas reporting needs an overhaul – it’s time to directly measure the atmosphere

Read Matt Rigbys article in ‘The Conversation’ about how DARE-UK will highlight the differences between bottom-up and top-down emissions reporting. “Countries still figure out their emissions by adding up all the sources, without measuring what’s actually in the air”

“National greenhouse gas reporting needs an overhaul – it’s time to directly measure the atmosphere”

How much greenhouse gas is emitted by any individual country? With global emissions of carbon dioxide hitting a record of 36.8 billion tonnes this year, and delegates gathering in Madrid for the latest UN climate talks, it’s a pressing question.

One might assume that we know precisely how much is emitted by any given country, and that such figures are rigorously cross-checked and scrutinised. And in some respects, this is true – countries are….. read more 

Members of DARE-UK engage 300+ students in a 2 day science extravaganza

The University of Bristol’s, Aoife, Alecia, Jenna and Kanokrat, as well as our volunteer Charlotte, took their research out to educate and inspire young people and adults at last weekend’s country-wide Science Festival. We engaged with over 300 students on Friday at We the Curious, where they enjoyed testing their breath for carbon dioxide, building greenhouse gas molecules, guessing the carbon footprint of using a smart phone or watching Netflix, and guessing which animals burp the most methane! Saturday night saw We the Curious open to the public for a spectacular evening of science extravaganza. We the Curious was transformed with interactive exhibits from groups all over the University for FUTURES Up Late, complete with its own bar and DJ. We had loads of interest in our research and people queued up to play our quizzes and find out how they could reduce their carbon emissions. It felt great to get out there and engage with the public, sharing our research and getting the public’s take on what we do … whilst dancing along to some funky tunes too!

Alecia, Charlotte, Jenna and Aoife celebrating after a succesful day of fun science engaging over 300 students.
Repairs made to the methane cow ahead of FUTURES2019 science extravaganza.
Mending the methane cows tail ahead of FUTURES2019 science extravaganza.